Posts by keirmartland

Liberty in the Age of Trump


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Liberty in the Age of Trump: A Symposium, with Jim Turney


LIBERTY IN THE AGE OF TRUMP, WITH JIM TURNEY
SOUTH KENSINGTON
(4PM-6PM) 18TH FEBRUARY 2017

The Hoop and Toy (upstairs)
34 Thurloe Place, London, SW7 2HQ

Less than a month after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States, it is still unclear to many what exactly his presidency will mean for civil liberties, immigration, free markets, international trade, and war and peace. To discuss the Trump presidency and the US and European libertarian movements’ continued relevance, all are welcome to Mises UK’s intimate symposium in South Kensington featuring Jim Turney, former US Libertarian Party Chair. Free admission (donations welcome).
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The Trump Presidency Will Not Be a Disaster


The Trump Presidency Will Not Be a Disaster
Keir Martland
5th February 2017

Last night, I spoke at the Cambridge University Conservative Association’s staple event – Port & Policy – for a third time. The motion against which I spoke was that “This House Believes the Trump Presidency Will Be a Disaster.” The following was my argument, though not nearly so eloquently as written up here ex post facto:

It is an undeniable and perhaps regrettable fact that Presidents of the United States affect more people than just citizens of the United States. It therefore, sadly, matters to us which inadequate inhabits the White House far more than it matters who is currently President of Brazil. We are therefore required to pass judgement on US Presidents in a way in which we simply are not with regards to other world leaders. Continue reading

Why was Charles I executed?


Why was Charles I executed?
By Keir Martland 

I am what might be jokingly termed a ‘crypto-Anglican.’ Often, I attend some of the more ‘High Church’ services in the Church of England, principally at my College Chapel when ‘on duty’ as a Warden, alongside my regular attendance of Roman Catholic services. This is partly out of a spirit of ecumenism and partly out of an aesthetic appreciation of Choral Evensong and Anglican High Mass according to the Book of Common Prayer. Indeed, there is much to recommend this kind of Anglicanism to the aesthete. Firstly, the Church of England owns – or rather, is in possession of – all the old Catholic churches in this country, and these churches are invariably the prettiest in the country. Secondly, there is something charming, but also interesting on an academic level, about the Cranmerian English of the Prayer Book, such as in the archaic and foreign-sounding “spare thou them.” Thirdly, the Anglican choral tradition is hard to compete with, and Choral Evensong – at least, at my College Chapel – is a delight for those who enjoy early Stuart and Restoration Era “Mag & Nuncs” and anthems (the works of Orlando Gibbons and Pelham Humphrey are particular favourites of mine). It is this rich tradition that the Personal Ordinariates established by Pope Benedict XVI seek to preserve.

And yet I digress already, for it is in a spirit of ecumenism (an entirely benign effect of Vatican II) and not aestheticism that I write today. Today is the 368th anniversary of the execution of the Anglican Martyr King Charles I. 368 years ago, Charles I was executed outside the Banqueting House at Whitehall following two Civil Wars, also known as the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. Charles had lost both Civil Wars and had failed to reach a settlement with the Scots, Parliament, or the Army, and eventually the latter took the initiative to break the deadlock, put him on “trial” following a royalist defeat in the Second Civil War, and murdered him. But why did this happen? Continue reading

Ralph Raico R.I.P.


By David Gordon

I am sorry to have to report that Ralph Raico has passed away. His intellectual brilliance was evident from an early age, and while still in high school, he attended Ludwig von Mises’s seminar at New York University. There he met Murray Rothbard, who became his lifelong friend. Ralph was one of the most brilliant members of Rothbard’s Circle Bastiat. He received a PhD from the University of Chicago, working under Friedrich Hayek. Ralph became the leading historian of classical liberalism and also a renowned authority on revisionist historyHis books Classical Liberalism and the Austrian School and Great Wars and Great Leadersshow penetrating analytical skills, immense learning, and devotion to liberty. He lectured at the Mises University and other conferences of the Mises Institute for many years. Continue reading