Posts by Neil Lock

Two Limericks about Donald Trump


By the Darn-Poor Rhymer

The Trumpets have sounded! No doubt
That the ruling class called a time out.
A breath of fresh air
We can take, if we dare,
But it isn’t yet timely to shout.

I really don’t know about Trump.
Is he good? Is he bad? Can he jump?
But his foes are mine;
And he’ll do just fine,
If he lays them to rest in the dump.

Three verses to welcome 2017


By the Darn-Poor Rhymer

Economy is to ecology
As astronomy is to astrology.

Left is theft, and right is might, and never the twain should meet;
Yet both agree that we should suffer cameras on the street.
And both desire to tax us hard, and shrivel us with fright;
My friend, tell me the difference between the left and right.

When politics has met its doom,
Ten billion human beings will bloom.

Rivers


By the Darn-Poor Rhymer

The X, the Y, the U, the D,
They all flow down towards the C.

The A1 and the 7 greet,
As at a confluence they meet.

The River Eden is in 5;
There, Adam had 6 with his wife.

Old Father Thames we should not hate;
He turns a bend at Chiswick 8.

I’ve 1 more river. It’s the Ts,
And it goes nowhere near St. Bs.

Such talk is Irk-some? And 2ché?
Good 0 from the 4shore of the Wey.

Cambridge blues


As an alumnus of Cambridge university, three times a year I receive a copy of a large, glossy (ish) magazine called CAM. This rag is produced on behalf of the university, and mailed for free to its former students. While I often gag at what I read in it, I do find it useful as a kind of barometer of what the academic auxiliaries of the British ruling élite are thinking.

Continue reading

frank-van-dun-520x245

Conviviality


Introduction

About ten years ago, the Belgian philosopher of law Frank van Dun published a paper entitled “Concepts of Order.” In that paper he gives, among much else, an account of what he calls the convivial order. In this order, “people live together regardless of their membership, status, position, role or function in any, let alone the same, society.” It appeared in a book “Ordered Anarchy: Jasay and His Surroundings,” published in 2007 as a tribute to Anthony de Jasay. It has been preserved on the Internet on Anthony Flood’s website here [1].

Around the same time, the German-American libertarian philosopher Hans-Hermann Hoppe published a paper, “The Idea of a Private Law Society” [2]. That paper outlines some of the institutions, which might maintain order and justice in societies without political states.

Recently, I re-read Frank van Dun’s work in this area, and I find it seminal. I was surprised and rather disappointed to find no evidence of anyone having tried to build on his framework in the intervening decade or so. So today, I’ll try to build on the theoretical ideas of Frank van Dun and the practical suggestions of Hans-Hermann Hoppe. I’m going to sketch a picture of how people might be able to live together, and resolve their disputes, without a state or a “sovereign.” Continue reading