‘Tariffs’, the ‘Lib Dems’ and (yes you’ve guessed it) the EU (Ronald Olden)


Ronald Olden

The subject of ‘Tariffs’ like many others, seems to have become something beyond which debate is no longer permissible. But we know from experience, that when any dogma arrives at that status of unchallengeable, the conventional wisdom is nearly always wrong. Usually because no discussion of the subject is permissible in ‘liberal’ company.

Until the early 1980s the ‘Left’ in Britain were not merely in favour of high selective tariffs, but demanded PHYSICAL import controls (but only, of course for unionised and nationalised industries). Anyone who said otherwise was a ‘Thatcherite’ bent on ‘destroying’ British Industry, or, unfashionably ‘Old’ Labour. Continue reading

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2016 and the future – Robert Henderson


What has changed over the past year?
The grip of the Western globalists is slipping.   They do not   realise it yet but their day is  almost done. Their ramshackle ideology,   a toxic blend of open borders politically correct internationalism  and what is crony capitalism but called by  those with a vested interest in it neo-liberal or laissez faire  economics , has wrought as it was certain to do,  rage and increasingly despair amongst  the majority of electors in Western states who are increasingly turning to  politicians that at least have some grasp of what is necessary to preserve  the viability of Western nation states. Continue reading

Advertising and Big Data: A Government Scourge


Chris Shaw

Advertising and Big Data: A Government Scourge

Advertising and big data act as two elements with the capacity to end corporate dominance if the necessary steps can be taken. They act as the quasi-independent creations of the government scourge of mass production, born of the system of the factory, emplaced in the wider social factory of commercial neoliberalism that surrounds the modern world. The fundamental need to push products into the hands of more consumers necessitates the creation of allure, of spectacle. An iPhone would be generic without its characteristic apple. Yet such constructs have a fatalistic quality, that being the genericism inherent that leads to lower quality, higher production and more genericism. Continue reading

Chris Tame on Big Business and the New Corporate Ruling Classes


Chris R. Tame (1949-2006) was for many years the face of British libertarianism. Tame discovered Ayn Rand’s work when he was seventeen and quickly became a libertarian. Having been involved with established organisations such as the Society for Individual Freedom and the Institute for Economic Affairs, and dismayed by the lack of an explicitly libertarian organisation in the UK, he and a few others broke away to found what was later to become the Libertarian Alliance, of which he was the first director. His activism also involved a highly successful period as director of the smokers’ rights organisation, FOREST. He died of bone cancer on 20th March 2006.

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MTI012: Austrian Economics with Andy Duncan


Great interview with the financial derivatives expert and Austrian economist Andy Duncan about the destruction of money and its effect on the world, with a discussion on the role of capitalism, labor, markets, and the value of capital on the destruction of money.

Andy thoroughly describes and explains the cycle of money in markets, and how the government influences these flows. He talks about the history of money and the effects of the gold standard, as well as possible outcomes to the excessive government spending we see today.

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No Wonder The Pols Think Businessman Trump’s Crazy; He Understands Scarcity


BY ILANA MERCER

Right after the Murder-by-Muslim of the San Bernardino 14, on Dec. 2, immigration lawyers peppered the press with praise for America’s fiancé K-1 visa program. This immigration program is “robust” came the message from the lobbyists. Continue reading

EU referendum: the invisible revolution


Richard North

Note by Sean Gabb Richard says: “The way we are governed has undergone a revolution – an invisible revolution.” This is a depressingly true observation. Getting us out of the current mess we are in will take more than a rearrangement of the bottoms on seats in Parliament. We need to consider something like a (non-violent) revolution, in which we shall spend many years under regulatory siege by the rest of the world. I suspect Richard is not that unhappy with much of the regulation we now suffer. His main wish is that we should leave the EU and move one step up the chain of authority, so we can have more direct influence. What we can learn from him, I suggest, is the enormity of what needs to be done to make this country free again, and how little intellectual preparation the well-funded policy institutes have made for this. SIG Continue reading