Life With Islam And Its Enablers


By ilana mercer

As I write, the Russians are hunting down the perpetrator of an attack on the St. Petersburg subway, in which 14 people were killed and some 45 injured. It took Russian authorities no time at all before an image of a possible culprit was circulated. Continue reading

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Terrorism: Is Christianity to Blame?


Tormod

It has become quite a widely-held position amongst the Alt-Right that fault for the loss of identity and in-group loyalty and even the self-sabotage of Western societies is the result (the inevitable result, as some would even have it) of Christianity. Some of those who hold this viewpoint even go so far as to attempt to resurrect or at least extract certain elements of the pre-Christian religions of Europe. However, I find this view to be mistaken and is based upon an historical horizon that stretches scarcely more than a single century into the past. Continue reading

Terrorism and the Ethics of Collective Punishment


Terrorism and the Ethics of Collective Punishment
by Sean Gabb
(23rd March 2017)

Outraged by yesterday’s terrorist attack in London, one of my Facebook friends has posted this:

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. The way to deal with Islamic terrorism is mercilessly. You must not be squeamish about liberal use of the death penalty for those who commit or attempt acts of terror, or their associates. You must not be squeamish about retaliatory acts against their friends and families. Every attendee at their mosque should be deported if a dual of foreign national, then no stone of the building should be left standing and the soil soaked in pigs blood.

If you don’t do these things, or attack those who do, you are enabling terror. You yourself have some blood on your hands. This is not me being angry, for I am not angry at all. I’ve just read some history, and this is how it is. Not taking necessary dissuasive action is profoundly harmful. It is evil.

Continue reading

Thoughts on the 11th September 2001


Thoughts on the 11th September 2001
by Sean Gabb
(5th September 2002)

Introductory

On the 11th September 2001, I started out on holiday with Mrs Gabb to Greece. I was disembarking in a small airport when the bombings happened in America. We then drove off immediately to a small cottage in the hills above Chania, and did not go into town until we had eaten and drunk everything in the rather generous welcome pack left for us. When I did eventually hear about the bombings, I went back to the cottage and, looking out over the bay far beneath, wrote the following article in a lined exercise book I had bought for the purpose. Continue reading

Imitating a Broken Record


Imitating a Broken Record
Keir Martland
(4th August 2016)

Since I last bothered to write something about terrorism on 12th June following the deaths of fifty gay men in Orlando, there have been a number of new atrocities. One of these was in Nice, one in the Alps, two in Munich, one in Reutlingen, one in Ansbach, and on the same day one in Rouen and one in Berlin. And then there was London, in the small hours of the morning of 4th August. These attacks are obviously sickening to any person of sound mind, and yet it is very easy to get bored – for want of a better word – of responding to them.

Even so, I am still of the opinion, which I express to my friends following every such incident when asked for comment, that these attacks are caused by bad politics and that we should not be scared, as libertarians, anarchists, nationalists, and conservatives, of ‘politicising’ them. The correct response is to properly mourn the loss of innocent Europeans, and then to have a proper think about how to avoid a repeat of the incident. What has actually happened every time is that we have seen countless people tweet their sadness or add a temporary overlay to the Facebook profile picture, and then wilfully forget about it. Furthermore, the words of the Prime Minister of France, that we should “learn to live with terrorism”, are entirely inappropriate since it is the duty of the State to protect its citizens. As I said, bad politics caused these attacks; good politics can prevent them. Continue reading

Let The Gun Market Close Government Loopholes


By ilana mercer

It’s award time at the Department of Homeland Security. So fleeting has been the focus on the systemic, intractable failures of the DHS apparatus—that failed functionaries feel sufficiently at ease to move on to the business of backslapping and promotion.

But first, the latest outrage to emerge from Barack Hussein Obama’s Islamophilic Federal Bureau of Investigation is this: It transpires a friend of Orlando mass murderer Omar Saddiqui Mateen had done his duty and reported Mateen to the FBI. Continue reading

Mateen Was Loud And Proud About His Orientation As Aspiring Muslim Terrorist


By ilana mercer

Democrats are frenetically trying to pass legislation that’ll make it impossible for anyone on the government’s terrorist list to legally purchase a firearm. Their renewed Brownian motion is due to the massacre, last Sunday, of 49 gay club-goers in Orlando, Florida. The Muslim American perpetrator wounded 53 others.

The premise of passing such a law, one would hope, is this: Had mass murderer Omar Saddiqui Mateen been in the “Terrorist Screening Database,” he would not have been authorized to purchase the long gun (AR-15 rifle) and handgun (a Glock) he used in the massacre. Both were bought legally.

Here’s the rub: But for a brief appearance, Mateen was not on the government’s terrorist watch list. He didn’t qualify. But boy, did he try. Mateen gave it his best. Government agents diligently kept him off The List. For Omar Mateen it was near impossible to get on the terrorist watch lists. Continue reading