97c0bfb12fc9a496cbc472643605ce53

PARDONING GAYS (Ron Olden)


Ronald Olden

The UK is to pardon nearly 50.000 Gay men convicted under the old homophobic laws.

If the victims of this law are already dead, these pardons are of no value whatsoever to the individuals concerned or to their living families. And, there are issues of principle associated with it. The individuals concerned broke the law as it was at the time, and we are all supposed to obey the law. Continue reading

Advertisements
51391017

The shortest honeymoon ever


Less than a week ago, I was saying nice things about Donald Trump. It hurts me to swallow my words.

Trump started so well; moving to approve the Keystone pipeline, and placing some sane people at the top of the EPA. Starting to dismantle Obamacare too, maybe. And setting out a more realistic attitude to the Russians.

But then he bars, suddenly and arbitrarily, entry to the USA for certain nationals. Not immigration – that I could have understood – but entry. Even for those who have homes there.

Continue reading

270117_may_and_trump

Trump’s first big mistake


by D.J. Webb

Theresa May was, for no good reason, granted one of the earliest meetings with President Trump. She apparently used the meeting to peddle her globalist agenda, including the supposed importance of NATO. It seems that Mr Trump is pro-British and has given her a certain latitude; I would have told her to decide within ten seconds if she wanted an alliance and a trade deal to replace Brexit or whether she was going to continue to mouth off on the globalist agenda and thus destroy the relationship with the new administration. Continue reading

780

Why was Charles I executed?


Why was Charles I executed?
By Keir Martland 

I am what might be jokingly termed a ‘crypto-Anglican.’ Often, I attend some of the more ‘High Church’ services in the Church of England, principally at my College Chapel when ‘on duty’ as a Warden, alongside my regular attendance of Roman Catholic services. This is partly out of a spirit of ecumenism and partly out of an aesthetic appreciation of Choral Evensong and Anglican High Mass according to the Book of Common Prayer. Indeed, there is much to recommend this kind of Anglicanism to the aesthete. Firstly, the Church of England owns – or rather, is in possession of – all the old Catholic churches in this country, and these churches are invariably the prettiest in the country. Secondly, there is something charming, but also interesting on an academic level, about the Cranmerian English of the Prayer Book, such as in the archaic and foreign-sounding “spare thou them.” Thirdly, the Anglican choral tradition is hard to compete with, and Choral Evensong – at least, at my College Chapel – is a delight for those who enjoy early Stuart and Restoration Era “Mag & Nuncs” and anthems (the works of Orlando Gibbons and Pelham Humphrey are particular favourites of mine). It is this rich tradition that the Personal Ordinariates established by Pope Benedict XVI seek to preserve.

And yet I digress already, for it is in a spirit of ecumenism (an entirely benign effect of Vatican II) and not aestheticism that I write today. Today is the 368th anniversary of the execution of the Anglican Martyr King Charles I. 368 years ago, Charles I was executed outside the Banqueting House at Whitehall following two Civil Wars, also known as the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. Charles had lost both Civil Wars and had failed to reach a settlement with the Scots, Parliament, or the Army, and eventually the latter took the initiative to break the deadlock, put him on “trial” following a royalist defeat in the Second Civil War, and murdered him. But why did this happen? Continue reading

A most perverse court ruling


By D. J. Webb

We have discussed constitutional issues regularly on the Libertarian Alliance blog. The issues are well-worn, and as far as I can see such issues rapidly become a dialogue of the deaf, as most of those who have a keen interest have long taken established standpoints. But the ruling of the so-called “Supreme Court” that the government cannot begin the process of withdrawal from the European Union without an Act of Parliament is so consequential that it will brook a number of articles expressing a variety of viewpoints. Continue reading

free-trade

‘Tariffs’, the ‘Lib Dems’ and (yes you’ve guessed it) the EU (Ronald Olden)


Ronald Olden

The subject of ‘Tariffs’ like many others, seems to have become something beyond which debate is no longer permissible. But we know from experience, that when any dogma arrives at that status of unchallengeable, the conventional wisdom is nearly always wrong. Usually because no discussion of the subject is permissible in ‘liberal’ company.

Until the early 1980s the ‘Left’ in Britain were not merely in favour of high selective tariffs, but demanded PHYSICAL import controls (but only, of course for unionised and nationalised industries). Anyone who said otherwise was a ‘Thatcherite’ bent on ‘destroying’ British Industry, or, unfashionably ‘Old’ Labour. Continue reading